WikiLeaks and the war legacy

The opening sentence of the Prologue of my book Overcoming the Bush Legacy in Iraq and Afghanistan (Potomac Books, Inc, Washington, DC, 2010) –

“The inaugural decade of the twenty-first century is captured in images that will forever live in the annals of history to remind future generations about how a period that began with so much promise turned out to be so violent and disappointing.”  

After the publication of WikiLeaks Iraq War Logs, the rest in the book …

Wikileaks Iraq war diary

After Afghanistan, now the Wikileaks Iraq war diary shows:

• US authorities failed to investigate hundreds of reports of abuse, torture, rape and even murder by Iraqi police and soldiers whose conduct appears to be systematic and normally unpunished. American forces are trainers and mentors of these Iraqi units.
• A US helicopter gunship involved in a notorious Baghdad incident had previously killed Iraqi insurgents after they tried to surrender.
• More than 15,000 civilians died in previously unknown incidents. US and UK officials have insisted that no official record of civilian casualties exists but the logs record 66,081 non-combatant deaths out of a total of 109,000 fatalities. The numerous reports of detainee abuse, often supported by medical evidence, describe prisoners shackled, blindfolded and hung by wrists or ankles, and subjected to whipping, punching, kicking or electric shocks.  

US Secretary of State Hilary Clinton’s response on the Wikileaks Iraq war logs: “The leaking of the documents should be condemned in the ‘most clear terms’ because it could place US soldiers and other personnel in danger and threatens US national security as well as that of “those with whom we are working.”

No regret, no shame, repentance out of the question. Depravity has sunk to a new low in this “war on terror” started by George W. Bush and now prosecuted by Barack Obama, the law professor.